Ererything Is Un- Persona 4 The Golden Animation 11 Review

How about a new review style? Start in one post, end in the next. Kinda dumb, huh? Everything Is Un- Persona 4 The Golden Animation 11 Review

Persona 4 the Golden Animation – 11 Let It Out! Let It GO!

OK. I will.

Please change your narrative flow P4GA team. The current set up is not making me want to continue watching the series. Poorly constructed cliffhangers are frustrating and anti-climactic. Perhaps the structure of this episode was meant to mirror the first episode, but that one had two endings, while this latest episode had one…

View On WordPress

kamenradar:

Kamen Rider Gaim – Episode 45 Review
In last week’s review, I ended by stating that how Gaim handles the mess its made for itself will be a defining aspect in its legacy, and how people remember the series. Does this episode make sense of the chaos?
Well, sort of.
It’s impossible to talk about this episode without digging into the unfortunate way that Gaim has handled its female characters. With Mai robbed of her agency until Kaito and Kouta duke it out, and Yoko shifting gears from pragmatic opportunist to doting housewife, it was up to this episode to at least right some of these wrongs. In that aspect, it’s something of a mixed bag.

Yoko’s case is perhaps the most grievous. Here we have an intelligent, strong woman who ends up being anti-climactically offed in service of the man she is – and it’s pretty much confirmed, in this episode – in love with. It’s a shame, too, since it not only does it wrap up a pretty bad arc for a character with a lot of potential (she did her own in-suit stunts, for God’s sake!), it ends up stealing the thunder from what should have, alone, served as the core of the episode’s first half: the confrontation between Zack and Kaito.

Zack has never had a huge amount of screen time, but it’s always been evident the extreme level of respect that Zack has for Kaito. Kaito, too, has shown care for Zack, leaving him in charge of Team Baron and supporting him during the All Riders show (wow, that feels like an eternity ago). It’s a seismic shift in Zack’s perception for him to decide to murder Kaito, and the show handles it with the appropriate gravitas. The bombing plot is a great way to bring some members of the tertiary cast together, and more importantly, it underlines the severe ways the relationship dynamics in Gaim have changed. As Zack astutely points out, Kaito has always used the power he’s obtained to defeat the forces that would seek to oppress him. Once all of those forces had been eliminated, who would he turn that power on next? When all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.
What makes the character conflicts in Gaim so fascinating is that most of the characters have not changed much since the first episode. Kouta is still the doe-eyed idealist; Mitsuzane has always been a conniving opportunist; and Kaito, a man who values the strength of the individual above all else. There are exceptions, of course – Pierre, Jonouchi, Zack, and Peko are all eventually humanized when they understand the dire circumstances they must face – but it’s no coincidence that these are not the primary characters.
But at their cores, Kouta, Kaito and Mitsuzane are largely the same people they’ve been for the duration of the entire story. They represent particular ideologies, and what changes is not them, but the context they exist within; depending on that context, ideologies become intensified, twisted, or crushed against one another.

Kaito’s transformation from anti-hero to villain feels sudden, due to the character’s sympathetic portrayal during the majority of the Overlord saga. There’s a collective sense – and I’m guilty of this, too – that these recent developments undo all of the hard work that Kaito underwent in order to change, in order to become a better person. Except he never did.
Kaito was always totally down with Helheim consuming the entire planet, leaving only the strong to survive. Kaito opposed the Overlords not because they endangered the world, but because they were an oppressive force that preyed on the powerless, and an overwhelming force that reminded him of his own weakness. The Overlords were manifestations of everything that Kaito resents about his own world, but with a far more immense destructive power. Kaito is fine with the world being destroyed if it leads to the evolution of humanity; however, he could not abide the senseless violence of Redue and Demushu.
This episode dots the i in Kaito’s ideology, as he lays out his reasons for destroying the world. Humanity exists with strength and compassion as opposing forces; as one becomes stronger, they lose their compassion, and compassion will prevent one from achieving true strength. As the strong have no compassion, they will seek to oppress the weak. Kaito will replace the broken system of humanity with a new life that will not seek to oppress, while simultaneously destroying humanity within the framework of the grotesque system of oppression that they devised. This reframes Kaito’s dialogue much earlier in the series about using power to subjugate the weak; he is, by his own understanding, simply playing by the same rules that the oppressive forces above him have always utilized for their own benefit.
All of this is born from Kaito’s own feelings of weakness – this is revenge on the grandest scale – but there is also a tacit self-awareness in his acknowledgement that the strong cannot be compassionate. Having finally gained the power necessary to truly exercise his strength, he has lost the slivers of compassion that remained. The same man who assured Kouta that Redue’s hostages were now safe is now willing to eradicate humanity in the same way that Mitsuzane would have been complicit in it. It’s important to note, though, that Kaito only ever chastised Mitsuzane for thinking he could make a place for himself under the Overlords, and not for being willing to destroy the world.

The strangest way that Kaito’s ideology is manifesting right now is in the way he treats Mai. I’m of the opinion that this isn’t a love story no matter how much it is framed as one; while Kaito may have come to respect Mai, he is – as always – driven by the pursuit of power, and his desire is for the fruit alone. While “I want you” may seem cut-and-dry, following it up with “Give me the golden fruit” is certainly less romantic. He sees Mai and the fruit as one, which is … well, true.
Meanwhile, Mai is still problematically in a state where she is unable to exercise any agency. To her credit, though, she at least chastises Kaito in this exchange:

Kaito: “I want you. Give me the golden fruit.”Mai: “Me or the fruit? Which one do you want?”Kaito: “I won’t choose. I don’t see a difference. I will claim the fruit, become the strongest, and take you as well.”Mai: “You always think you can take whatever you want, right, Kaito?”

Kaito respected Mai for her strength, and thusly respected her as an individual. But he had no interest in her. Kaito now desires to claim her because of what she represents: the ultimate power that he has struggled and suffered to obtain.
It’s unfortunate that her character has been shoehorned into the damsel in distress trope, but there’s at least someone who’s interested in saving her because he loves her, and not because she can give him the ultimate power. While Sagara has explained the nature of the fruit to Mitsuzane and Kaito, all Kouta’s gotten is a very brief manifesto from Kaito that doesn’t do much to explain anything at all. Kouta is, as always, reacting to immediate circumstances rather than as part of some longer term plan.

As Kouta bites into a Helheim fruit and enjoys it with no ill-effects, the consequences of his short-term thinking appear to have been cemented. This scene is Kouta at his best; rather than the typical heroic self-sacrifice, Kouta admits that he wasn’t sure that this was the right thing to do. But despite whatever consequences he must bear, he has the power to do good, now.
The duel between Kouta and Kaito is a clash of ideologies. Kaito believes that the strongest thing he can do is erase the world and start anew; Kouta believes that strength is fixing the world that they have now. You cannot buy hope with such a grave sacrifice.
I don’t normally write much about the action sequences – either they’re good or they’re not, usually – but it’s worth giving props to the team this week for delivering something truly exhilarating. While the CGI is as bad as usual, the way the scene is structured almost like a ride at an amusement park makes it a blast to watch, and Gaim’s suit actor – the legendary Seiji Takaiwa – does a great job adjusting his fighting style to be more unhinged and ruthless than usual, perfectly encapsulating Kouta’s frustration.

And as the two face-off, the real wildcard in-play is Mitsuzane. Mitsuzane has an epiphany in this episode, realizing that Takatora’s ridiculing is a manifestation of his own pain and guilt. And when Takatora says that Mitsuzane simply clung to where he felt safe, it’s a confirmation of what I’ve suspected about Mitsuzane’s behavioural patterns before:

It’s hard to feel anything but pity for Mitsuzane. He’s a rotten fruit, to be sure, but he’s also a child that has been subjected to unspeakable horrors and faced impossible dilemmas. He is also utterly naïve, willing to do anything to find a place for himself. From Team Gaim, to Yggdrasil, to the Overlords, and now as Mai’s self-appointed guardian, Mitsuzane has fluidly moved through roles in the hopes of making a home for himself, never having a firm ideology to adhere to.

With the heavy focus on Mitsuzane’s inability to accomplish anything, it’s hard to believe that the show will end without him doing something. I believe he will play a pivotal role in resolving the final conflict. In what capacity he can do that, though, is anyones guess.
* * *
Additional Thoughts

Some of the video quality seems really off this week. In the scene in Druper’s, along with the close-up of Kaito’s face as Yoko is dying, it’s like they filmed the show with a webcam.
Zack, you could have avoided a lot of trouble by sticking the bomb before you talked to Kaito.
I don’t think Zack is dead; there’s no way they’d simply not give attention to Kaito murdering the guy. (Also, his actor didn’t get flowers, but Yoko’s did.)
The sudden appearance of the SDF feels weirdly nationalistic. Perhaps a coincidence, or was someone involved uncomfortable with the portrayal of the SDF as having abandoned Japan’s most vulnerable populace?
I wish they would stop showing that flashback of Kaito’s home being torn down. I need to believe that his desire to destroy the world comes from more than that.
I can’t wait for Ranbu Escalation to come out.
Next on Kamen Rider Gaim: “KAZURABA!!” “KAITO!!”


A lot of interesting points here.

kamenradar:

Kamen Rider Gaim – Episode 45 Review

In last week’s review, I ended by stating that how Gaim handles the mess its made for itself will be a defining aspect in its legacy, and how people remember the series. Does this episode make sense of the chaos?

Well, sort of.

It’s impossible to talk about this episode without digging into the unfortunate way that Gaim has handled its female characters. With Mai robbed of her agency until Kaito and Kouta duke it out, and Yoko shifting gears from pragmatic opportunist to doting housewife, it was up to this episode to at least right some of these wrongs. In that aspect, it’s something of a mixed bag.

Yoko’s case is perhaps the most grievous. Here we have an intelligent, strong woman who ends up being anti-climactically offed in service of the man she is – and it’s pretty much confirmed, in this episode – in love with. It’s a shame, too, since it not only does it wrap up a pretty bad arc for a character with a lot of potential (she did her own in-suit stunts, for God’s sake!), it ends up stealing the thunder from what should have, alone, served as the core of the episode’s first half: the confrontation between Zack and Kaito.

Zack has never had a huge amount of screen time, but it’s always been evident the extreme level of respect that Zack has for Kaito. Kaito, too, has shown care for Zack, leaving him in charge of Team Baron and supporting him during the All Riders show (wow, that feels like an eternity ago). It’s a seismic shift in Zack’s perception for him to decide to murder Kaito, and the show handles it with the appropriate gravitas. The bombing plot is a great way to bring some members of the tertiary cast together, and more importantly, it underlines the severe ways the relationship dynamics in Gaim have changed. As Zack astutely points out, Kaito has always used the power he’s obtained to defeat the forces that would seek to oppress him. Once all of those forces had been eliminated, who would he turn that power on next? When all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

What makes the character conflicts in Gaim so fascinating is that most of the characters have not changed much since the first episode. Kouta is still the doe-eyed idealist; Mitsuzane has always been a conniving opportunist; and Kaito, a man who values the strength of the individual above all else. There are exceptions, of course – Pierre, Jonouchi, Zack, and Peko are all eventually humanized when they understand the dire circumstances they must face – but it’s no coincidence that these are not the primary characters.

But at their cores, Kouta, Kaito and Mitsuzane are largely the same people they’ve been for the duration of the entire story. They represent particular ideologies, and what changes is not them, but the context they exist within; depending on that context, ideologies become intensified, twisted, or crushed against one another.

Kaito’s transformation from anti-hero to villain feels sudden, due to the character’s sympathetic portrayal during the majority of the Overlord saga. There’s a collective sense – and I’m guilty of this, too – that these recent developments undo all of the hard work that Kaito underwent in order to change, in order to become a better person. Except he never did.

Kaito was always totally down with Helheim consuming the entire planet, leaving only the strong to survive. Kaito opposed the Overlords not because they endangered the world, but because they were an oppressive force that preyed on the powerless, and an overwhelming force that reminded him of his own weakness. The Overlords were manifestations of everything that Kaito resents about his own world, but with a far more immense destructive power. Kaito is fine with the world being destroyed if it leads to the evolution of humanity; however, he could not abide the senseless violence of Redue and Demushu.

This episode dots the i in Kaito’s ideology, as he lays out his reasons for destroying the world. Humanity exists with strength and compassion as opposing forces; as one becomes stronger, they lose their compassion, and compassion will prevent one from achieving true strength. As the strong have no compassion, they will seek to oppress the weak. Kaito will replace the broken system of humanity with a new life that will not seek to oppress, while simultaneously destroying humanity within the framework of the grotesque system of oppression that they devised. This reframes Kaito’s dialogue much earlier in the series about using power to subjugate the weak; he is, by his own understanding, simply playing by the same rules that the oppressive forces above him have always utilized for their own benefit.

All of this is born from Kaito’s own feelings of weakness – this is revenge on the grandest scale – but there is also a tacit self-awareness in his acknowledgement that the strong cannot be compassionate. Having finally gained the power necessary to truly exercise his strength, he has lost the slivers of compassion that remained. The same man who assured Kouta that Redue’s hostages were now safe is now willing to eradicate humanity in the same way that Mitsuzane would have been complicit in it. It’s important to note, though, that Kaito only ever chastised Mitsuzane for thinking he could make a place for himself under the Overlords, and not for being willing to destroy the world.

The strangest way that Kaito’s ideology is manifesting right now is in the way he treats Mai. I’m of the opinion that this isn’t a love story no matter how much it is framed as one; while Kaito may have come to respect Mai, he is – as always – driven by the pursuit of power, and his desire is for the fruit alone. While “I want you” may seem cut-and-dry, following it up with “Give me the golden fruit” is certainly less romantic. He sees Mai and the fruit as one, which is … well, true.

Meanwhile, Mai is still problematically in a state where she is unable to exercise any agency. To her credit, though, she at least chastises Kaito in this exchange:

Kaito: “I want you. Give me the golden fruit.”
Mai: “Me or the fruit? Which one do you want?”
Kaito: “I won’t choose. I don’t see a difference. I will claim the fruit, become the strongest, and take you as well.”
Mai: “You always think you can take whatever you want, right, Kaito?”

Kaito respected Mai for her strength, and thusly respected her as an individual. But he had no interest in her. Kaito now desires to claim her because of what she represents: the ultimate power that he has struggled and suffered to obtain.

It’s unfortunate that her character has been shoehorned into the damsel in distress trope, but there’s at least someone who’s interested in saving her because he loves her, and not because she can give him the ultimate power. While Sagara has explained the nature of the fruit to Mitsuzane and Kaito, all Kouta’s gotten is a very brief manifesto from Kaito that doesn’t do much to explain anything at all. Kouta is, as always, reacting to immediate circumstances rather than as part of some longer term plan.

As Kouta bites into a Helheim fruit and enjoys it with no ill-effects, the consequences of his short-term thinking appear to have been cemented. This scene is Kouta at his best; rather than the typical heroic self-sacrifice, Kouta admits that he wasn’t sure that this was the right thing to do. But despite whatever consequences he must bear, he has the power to do good, now.

The duel between Kouta and Kaito is a clash of ideologies. Kaito believes that the strongest thing he can do is erase the world and start anew; Kouta believes that strength is fixing the world that they have now. You cannot buy hope with such a grave sacrifice.

I don’t normally write much about the action sequences – either they’re good or they’re not, usually – but it’s worth giving props to the team this week for delivering something truly exhilarating. While the CGI is as bad as usual, the way the scene is structured almost like a ride at an amusement park makes it a blast to watch, and Gaim’s suit actor – the legendary Seiji Takaiwa – does a great job adjusting his fighting style to be more unhinged and ruthless than usual, perfectly encapsulating Kouta’s frustration.

And as the two face-off, the real wildcard in-play is Mitsuzane. Mitsuzane has an epiphany in this episode, realizing that Takatora’s ridiculing is a manifestation of his own pain and guilt. And when Takatora says that Mitsuzane simply clung to where he felt safe, it’s a confirmation of what I’ve suspected about Mitsuzane’s behavioural patterns before:

It’s hard to feel anything but pity for Mitsuzane. He’s a rotten fruit, to be sure, but he’s also a child that has been subjected to unspeakable horrors and faced impossible dilemmas. He is also utterly naïve, willing to do anything to find a place for himself. From Team Gaim, to Yggdrasil, to the Overlords, and now as Mai’s self-appointed guardian, Mitsuzane has fluidly moved through roles in the hopes of making a home for himself, never having a firm ideology to adhere to.

With the heavy focus on Mitsuzane’s inability to accomplish anything, it’s hard to believe that the show will end without him doing something. I believe he will play a pivotal role in resolving the final conflict. In what capacity he can do that, though, is anyones guess.

* * *

Additional Thoughts

  • Some of the video quality seems really off this week. In the scene in Druper’s, along with the close-up of Kaito’s face as Yoko is dying, it’s like they filmed the show with a webcam.
  • Zack, you could have avoided a lot of trouble by sticking the bomb before you talked to Kaito.
  • I don’t think Zack is dead; there’s no way they’d simply not give attention to Kaito murdering the guy. (Also, his actor didn’t get flowers, but Yoko’s did.)
  • The sudden appearance of the SDF feels weirdly nationalistic. Perhaps a coincidence, or was someone involved uncomfortable with the portrayal of the SDF as having abandoned Japan’s most vulnerable populace?
  • I wish they would stop showing that flashback of Kaito’s home being torn down. I need to believe that his desire to destroy the world comes from more than that.
  • I can’t wait for Ranbu Escalation to come out.
  • Next on Kamen Rider Gaim: “KAZURABA!!” “KAITO!!”

A lot of interesting points here.

Kamen Rider Drive: Full Trailer

Kamen Rider Drive: Full Trailer

Originally posted on Brand New Love Song:

Earlier this week, we got the full trailer for Kamen Rider Drive, and it gave us a good look at the show we’re going to be spending the next year with. Let me tell you, I’m pretty damn excited and I want to go over some of the things we saw and what they might mean for Kamen Rider Drive.

View On WordPress

We Want Drive - Gaim 45 - RX! 82

Are you #TeamKaito or #TeamKouta? Join the discussion! We’re #TeamMai and #TeamDrive We Want Drive - Gaim45 RX! 82

Logo_Album https://ia601402.us.archive.org/27/items/RX082WeWantDrive/RX082WeWantDrive.mp3

Aleph, Ammit and Jonathan discuss and review Kamen Rider Gaim 45. Aleph steps out feeling a little under the weather, but Jonathan and Ammit stick around to slobber all over the extended Drive trailer.

Just some of the topics discussed are:

Kaito’s Misogyny

The show’s misogyny

How the dichotomy between Kouta and Kaito…

View On WordPress

Promotional material for the upcoming Kamen Rider Drive has stated that Tomari Shinnosuke calls the Drive Driver Mr. Belt, it will be its own character and a co-protagonist. Long time fans of the franchise, and the quick studies among new initiates may have had previous entries come to mind after learning of Drive’s talking Driver with a personality. Battle Hopper, Acrobatter, Rideron, Auto Vajin and Kivat all have served in varying degrees as communicative assistants in 4 separate series over 27 years. There was an 11 year break between Black RX and Kuuga, so perhaps the link is a bit tenuous, but it feels real enough to me. I like the concept a lot, but the one thing linking these four unique additions to the series is that they all could have been done better. While I don’t believe there was a concerted effort to create a progression from a machine affecting life to a fully fleshed out artificial intelligence, that trend can be seen by those who wish when taking a broad view of the material. If I wanted to I could stretch this premise to include Ichimonji’s use of the Typhoon’s remote control for Cyclone that randomly appeared in episode 26 of the original series, but I won’t.

The exception to the lack of intended progression is Battle Hopper which was reborn as Acrobatter and then had its life force used to spark Rideron to life. They both spoke in a way, without intelligible words or voices, and had some measure of personality. Ryuki introduced the talking belt to the series and, the following year Faiz featured an underused bike that transformed into a fighting robot in AutoVajin who would help out Takumi in fights now and then. Five years later, Kivat (Kibat) served as a sort of butler to Wataru Kurenai, in addition to helping him transform into Kiva. Kivat would give Wataru advice, encourage him to persevere and fight Fangire without Wataru when the two disagreed. I hope to see Mr. Belt go beyond all of these roles, especially because each iteration of this type of character or element of the show has differentiated itself from its predecessors.

Three possible roads Drive could take handling Mr. Belt that I would like to see are

  1. Phillip done well
  2. Battle Hopper or Auto Vajin + real personhood following the model of the Roimyuudo
  3. Late-Manga Takeshi Hongo

Phillip and Shotaro are allegedly the world’s finest partners, but I think Riku Sanjo failed to fully support their relationship, so it wasn’t as meaningful as it was supposed to be. We didn’t get to see them just hanging out enough and the closing of the gap between them could have been more teased out in a more satisfying way. As this is Sanjo’s show and the promotional material says that Mr. Belt and Shinnosuke are partners, the show provides a perfect opportunity to upstage W, one of the most popular series in recent history, in the Super-Partners department. I know not the appeal of the bro-fest, given my favorite Riders have a surrogate family as a group of friends, but if bros sell, then do it well. SInce Mr. Belt docks into Tridoron and Shinnosuke wears him, I hope they will get to talk a lot and form a really strong relationship. I admit that I dislike Shotaro a lot and his character almost entirely made W an unpalatable show for me, though I liked it just fine for the first 36 episodes or so. That being said, I am open to what Sanjo will do after having helmed Kyouryuger more or less single-handedly. He has more experience now and will hopefully be approaching this series with different things in mind. If Shinnosuke and Mr. Belt’s relationship can surpass that of Wataru and Kivat, I think the title of “world’s finest partners” will have to be relinquished by the two-in-one detective.

Battle Hopper and Auto Vajin are vehicles and are sort of like people. They have some ability to operate on their own and a modicum of personality, but that could be pushed farther. Kivat is a good mark to shoot for, but he could have been pushed even farther and more fully fleshed out. The more I think about this, Cheeda Nick (Red-Buster’s Buddyroid) comes to mind as a good model. He and the other Buddyroids were very much alive. Interestingly, the scant information available on the Roimyuudo makes them sound similar to Tokumei Sentai Go-Busters’ Vagras, in that they were manufactured for a purpose and are acting in a way that is deleterious to Tokyo’s citizenry because of that. It’s unclear if they are renegade or if some just don’t execute their programming in the nicest ways. The Roimyuudo start off as fresh machines with a blank slate and strive to surpass humanity with their superior robot nature. They evolve by associating with humans based on a common trait, proclivity or interest. I would like to see Mr. Belt grow more human over the course of the series as a result of his interactions with his car-fanatic partner Shinnosuke. Since Mr. Belt is part of a machine and we live in an era of interconnected gadgets, with programs and files that sync across multiple platforms, it would be really interesting to see Mr. Belt’s autonomy and personhood blossom in a way that leads to him to driving and controlling Tridoron while Shinnosuke is running around as Drive.

3. If you haven’t read Ishinomouri’s Kamen Rider manga and you are a Western fan, I think you should go buy it all now, funds permitting, to put money in coffers as thanks for the hundreds of hours of live-action Kamen Rider content (and the stack of Kamen Rider SPIRITS) sprung from the success of Ishinomouri’s classic. The 42-year-old show is good, the manga is better (at minimum, it is a good divergent take on the show). I’d like to see Mr. Belt and Shinnosuke’s relationship be like that between Ichimonji and Hongo towards the end of the Kamen Rider Manga. They were just two guys fighting against the same enemy, relying on each other to do together what neither could do alone. I might even like to see Mr. Belt get a body and become “the second Rider” of the show if that must happen. With my point about programs syncing across multiple platforms, it would be interesting to see Mr. Belt fighting alongside Drive in his own body as well as helping him from his waist.

Can Sanjo make Mr. Belt an interesting character? 3 Ways For Mr. Belt To Be Mr. Right - Kamen Rider Drive Speculation Promotional material for the upcoming Kamen Rider Drive has stated that Tomari Shinnosuke calls the Drive Driver Mr.

overdrivegeneration:

She says the first line and I am thinking she is about to say something actually worth anything… If she were to seek the fruit too… I thought… But then that second line and just… Nope.

Are we really having her last words be her comparing herself to Mai over Kaito’s affections? Really and truly? Someone please tell me I am interpreting this wrong. Not that any other meaning would be better but please tell me I’m wrong. 

(via fma245)

Kamen Rider Gaim ep 45… Again…

the-thought-emporium-imperial:

Spoilers this time.

Read More

That about sums it up.


I get so angry at the way Kamen Rider Spirits portrayed the death of Tackle. Stronger took it upon himself to decide that she should fade into obscurity because he felt it more important that she be “a normal woman” than a heroine. He had no right to do that. He destroyed her legacy.

I get so angry at the way Kamen Rider Spirits portrayed the death of Tackle. Stronger took it upon himself to decide that she should fade into obscurity because he felt it more important that she be “a normal woman” than a heroine. He had no right to do that. He destroyed her legacy.